The cost of industrial water treatment systems is calculated by four key factors:

  • What are the system’s flow-rate requirements? To put it another way, how quickly would you need to filter a given amount of water?
  • What are the chemistry and consistency characteristics of your influential stream?
  • What is the desired consistency standard for treated water?
  • What building materials are required?

Answering these questions will assist you in determining the requirements and further understanding the costs associated with an industrial water treatment system that is appropriate for your facility.

Levels of flow

In general, lower flow rates lead to lower capital costs in commercial water treatment systems. Although this law applies to most systems, flow rate may be more important for some technologies than others. Cost variations between large and small microfiltration (MF) units, for example, are relatively flexible depending on flow until the base cost of engineering, control panel, and cleaning systems are covered, whereas large volume ion exchange (IX) systems can be marginally more expensive. Increasing the flow by 50%, for example, will result in a 20% rise in cost.

The flow rate of a system is usually estimated in gallons per minute (GPM) and/or gallons per day (GPD). When budgeting for a new water treatment facility, bear in mind that the higher the GPM or GPD power, the greater the expenditure. Flow rates are often factored into system expenses, so before seeking a quote on a new water treatment system, make sure you have a precise calculation of your process requirements.

The quality of water

The chemistry and content of the stream to be processed are significant factors in the expense of most commercial water treatment systems. It is crucial to completely comprehend the forms and quantities of substances present, as well as any differences in stream composition. In general, the more toxins present, the more steps in a water treatment train there are, and the higher the initial cost. This is especially true for IX systems, where a complex stream will raise the initial cost many times over due to the need for more resin types, additives, and IX beds or columns.

Complex streams will dramatically increase the cost of certain technologies, such as RO/NF devices, due to the need for pretreatment. Although it is not always purely necessary, investing in suitable pretreatment equipment will help to dramatically reduce long-term costs by protecting downstream equipment, improving product yields, and decreasing waste disposal costs.

Purity of the goal

It is also important to consider the desired quality from an industrial water treatment plant. If you invest in a pharmaceutical water treatment facility, for example, you are most likely trying to follow regulatory requirements, which will differ considerably depending on the products you produce. Understanding the appropriate contaminant levels for your output limits will help you select the best technology to satisfy your requirements without overspending on water content that exceeds your goal range.

Materials for construction

The products used to instal your water treatment system may have a big effect on the cost. Many manufacturing applications require harsh environments, such as high flow speeds, intense temperatures or pH levels, and/or toxic chemicals, whereas others are less stressful. If this is the case at your factory, you will be able to save money up front by using less costly products like PVC piping and FRP tanks instead of more expensive parts like rubber-lined or stainless-steel vessels and/or piping. In certain cases, you will still be able to select between less costly manual controls and more expensive automatic PLC tables.

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